Wehr


The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Pine Warbler

The male Pine Warbler has olive-gray uppers with a yellow slightly streaked breast, dark legs, and white under parts, with white striped dark wings. The female Pine Warbler is similar colored to the male but duller. The immature Pine Warbler is drab all over with white wing bars. It has a range of eastern North America. It has a habitat of open pinewoods and pine barrens. It feeds on mostly insects, seeds, berries, and will come for suet at bird feeders.

 

The male Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The male Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The female Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Bong State Recreational Area in Franksville, Wisconsin.

The female Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Bong State Recreational Area in Kansasville, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Hairy Woodpecker

Select this link to see comparison Downy Woodpecker photos

The Hairy Woodpecker are checkered and spotted with black and white and a white back, breast and undersides. The male has a small red patch on the back of the head. The Hairy is like a large Downy and it has a bill larger in comparison to the Downy’s. The Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers are the only Woodpeckers with a white back. It has a range from Alaska and Canada to Panama. It has a habitat of forests, woodlands, river groves, and large shade trees. It feeds mostly on seeds and insects. It is less common and likely to show up in suburbs and city parks.

 

The Swainson's Thrush was photographed at the Wehr nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin during the May migration.

The Swainson’s Thrush was photographed at the Wehr nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin during the May migration.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Swainson’s Thrush

The Swainson’s Thrush is rustic or gray-brown in color with buff eye-ring and spotted breast, white belly, olive or brown on the flanks, and pink legs. The juvenile tends to be spotted or streaked on the back. It has a range of Alaska, Canada, and west and northeast United States. It has a habitat of Spruce forests and dense streamside woods. They tend to stay out of site. It feeds mostly on insects and berries.

 

The male Prothonotary Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The male Prothonotary Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller than the male and has a lighter bill, and more white below.

The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller than the male and has a lighter bill, and more white below.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Prothonotary Warbler

The male Prothonotary Warbler has a bright yellow head and breast with blue gray wings without bars, and a dark bill. The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller in coloring and a lighter bill. It can be difficult to tell from the female. It has a range from the Great Lakes Area to the southeast United States and Gulf Area. It has a habitat in wooded swamp areas. It has a diet of insects and snails. It nests in holes in trees and sometimes in birdhouses.

 

The Olive-Sided Flycatcher was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The Olive-Sided Flycatcher was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Olive-Sided Flycatcher

The Olive-Sided Flycatcher is a large gray flycatcher with a large head and bill, and with a white throat and breast with contrasting light gray flanks separated by a white strip. It has a range of Alaska, Canada, and western and northeaster United States. It has a habitat of conifer forests, and burned out, and cleared areas. It feeds almost entirely on flying insects, and likes to view them from treetops.

The male Common Grackle was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin

The male Common Grackle was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin

The female Common Grackle was photographed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The female Common Grackle was photographed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The juvenile Common Grackle was photographed at Myrtle Beach, in South Carolina

The juvenile Common Grackle was photographed at Myrtle Beach, in South Carolina

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is an iridescent blackbird larger than a Robin with a long wedge-shaped tail and a long heavy bill. The male has an iridescent purple head and a deep bronze or dull purple on the back. The female Common Grackle has a duller purple head and a browner, less iridescent on the back. The juvenile Common Grackle is a dull brown with various spotting depending on whether it is male or female. Depending on how the light hits the bird it may look almost black. It has a range of Canada and the United States east of the Rockies. It has a habitat of farmland, towns, groves, and streamsides. It feeds on insects of all types, worms, crayfish, other birds, and vegetable matter, such as berries and seeds. They are often seen nesting in small colonies and perching together in treetops.

The Veery was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin during bird migration.

The Veery was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin during bird migration.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Veery

The Veery is a uniform brown or tawny cast above with no strong eye ring and few or indistinct spots on the breast. It has grayish tones on the flanks. It has a range of southern Canada, and north and central United States. It has a habitat of damp and deciduous woods. It concentrates in woods with leafy understory and streams. It feeds on mostly insects and berries.

Next Page »