The Ovenbird was photographed in a Lake Park gully in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos of the Ovenbird

The Ovenbird Warbler is olive-brown above with stripes below, a white-eye ring, an orange patch on crown, and pinkish legs. It is usually difficult to see and is heard more often than seen. It has a range of South Canada, and the United States east of the Rockies. It has a habitat near ground in leafy deciduous woods and during migration in thickets. It has a diet of mostly insects, and some seeds. The name comes from reference to the bird’s nest, a domed structure with entrance on the side, like an old-fashioned oven.

 

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The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Pine Warbler

The male Pine Warbler has olive-gray uppers with a yellow slightly streaked breast, dark legs, and white under parts, with white striped dark wings. The female Pine Warbler is similar colored to the male but duller. The immature Pine Warbler is drab all over with white wing bars. It has a range of eastern North America. It has a habitat of open pinewoods and pine barrens. It feeds on mostly insects, seeds, berries, and will come for suet at bird feeders.

 

The male Prothonotary Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The male Prothonotary Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller than the male and has a lighter bill, and more white below.

The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller than the male and has a lighter bill, and more white below.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Prothonotary Warbler

The male Prothonotary Warbler has a bright yellow head and breast with blue gray wings without bars, and a dark bill. The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller in coloring and a lighter bill. It can be difficult to tell from the female. It has a range from the Great Lakes Area to the southeast United States and Gulf Area. It has a habitat in wooded swamp areas. It has a diet of insects and snails. It nests in holes in trees and sometimes in birdhouses.

 

This Nashville Warbler was photographed in Muskego, Wisconsin

This Nashville Warbler was photographed in Muskego, Wisconsin

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Nashville Warbler

The Nashville Warbler has a gray head, yellow throat with a olive-green back and no wing bars. It has a bright white-eye ring. Males may show a dull chestnut crown patch. It has a range of southern Canada, and western and northern United States. It has a habitat of cool open mixed woods with undergrowth, forest edges, and bogs. The diet is mostly insects including beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers,  leafhoppers, aphids, including eggs and larvae.

The female Northern Parula Warbler was sited and photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The female Northern Parula Warbler was sited and photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The male Northern Parula Warbler was photographed two years later than the female in Joplin, Missouri

The male Northern Parula Warbler was photographed two years later than the female (4/15/2013) in Joplin, Missouri

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Northern Parula Warbler

The female Northern Parula Warbler is a bluish warbler with a yellow throat and breast and two wing bars. They are brightly colored active birds with thin needlepointed bills. A green patch on the back is a clinching point for identification. The male Northern Parula Warbler is darker in coloring and is distinguished from the female by a dark band across the breast. They are impressive to first see flittering in the trees and brushes. Its habitat is mainly in humid woods. It mainly eats insects. Its normal range is eastern half of the states and Canada. It winters in Florida, Mexico to the West Indies, Nicaragua. I sighted the female on the migration North for two days at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I saw the male two years later in Joplin, Missouri.

You can see the sited location at the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin by clicking the link below.

Now when viewing each partial, 360, or spherical panorama photo (most are not), using the JAVA web browser plug-in, a security warning has been added by Oracle that asks “Do you want to run this application?” To continue select “Run” and if you don’t want to see this warning again checkDo not show this again for this app”. No other changes have been made in The Panorama Point web viewing site.

Select this link to see the Northern Parula Warbler site where it was sighted and photographed.

The Palm Warbler is one of the first Warblers that I photographed. This one was photographed from an uptairs window.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Palm Warbler

The Palm Warbler is brown above and yellowish or whitish below. In the spring it has a chestnut cap. The breast is narrowly streaked. It has a habitat of wooded borders, low trees, bushes, and ground cover. It likes to hide behind branches and cover in shaded places. It has a normal range of Canada and the NE United States. It Winters in the South United States to the Caribbean area. They feed on insects and berries.

The Wilson’s Warbler was sited and photographed at thje Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, Wiscosin. It was one of the first spring migration Warblers seen and photographed, but wasn’t identified until later.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Wilson’s Warbler

This Wilson’s Warbler was one of the first spring migration Warblers seen at my house and then at the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The male is yellow color with a round black cap, a yellow stripe above the eye, and a grayish top. I didn’t see a female, who is similar except may not show black cap. The habitat is in thickets along wooded streams, moist tangles, low shrubs, or willow trees. The range is Canada and the eastern New England States.

You can see the sited location at the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, WI by clicking the link below. The Wilson’s Warbler was sighted this year at my yard and the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, WI.

Select this link to see the Wilson’s Warbler site where it was sighted and photographed.