The Common Tern was photographed at North Beach Park in Racine, Wisconsin.

The Common Tern was photographed at North Beach Park in Racine, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos of the Common Tern, next select slideshow

The Common Tern is a small black-capped white gull-liked bird with a gray mantel, red-orange bill (bill with black tip) and legs, and with five outer dark wedge primaries. It has a range of the Northern Hemisphere, and is the most widespread of the terns. It has a habitat of lakes, ocean, bays, and beaches. It has a diet of mostly small fish, and forages mostly by flying over water, hovering, and plunging to catch prey below the water.

The Caspian Tern was photographed at Grant Park Beach in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The Caspian Tern was photographed at Grant Park Beach in South Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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The Caspian Tern is whitish-gray with a black cap and a large reddish bill with a touch of black tip, black legs, and blacker under the primaries. It is one of the larger terns as compared with the Common Tern. Size is compared to a Herring Gull. They have a range around the world, and breed and winter around the coastlines, and inland along lakes, rivers, and marshes. They have a habitat of large lakes, coastal waters, beaches, and bays. They feed on small fish, marine life, and large insects. It rarely swims and plunges from high to catch fish under the water surface. They usually nest in large densely packed colonies, but are not sociable. They are highly vocal.

 

The male Prothonotary Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center  in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The male Prothonotary Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller than the male and has a lighter bill, and more white below.

The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller than the male and has a lighter bill, and more white below.

Select this link to see photos of the Prothonotary Warbler, next select slideshow.

The male Prothonotary Warbler has a bright yellow head and breast with blue gray wings without bars, and a dark bill. The female Prothonotary Warbler is duller in coloring and a lighter bill. It can be difficult to tell from the female. It has a range from the Great Lakes Area to the southeast United States and Gulf Area. It has a habitat in wooded swamp areas. It has a diet of insects and snails. It nests in holes in trees and sometimes in birdhouses.

 

This Red- Eyed Vireo was photographed behind my house in Muskego, Wisconsin.

This Red- Eyed Vireo was photographed behind my house in Muskego, Wisconsin.

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The Red-Eyed Vireo is a small olive- or gray- backed bird, much like wood warblers but rounder head, with unbarred wings and with a strong black-bordered white eyebrow stripe. The bill has a more curved ridge and a slight hook. The red eye may not be obvious. It has a range from Canada to the Gulf States. It has a range of woodlands, shade trees, and groves. It feeds on mostly insects and berries. During summer it is usually around, but it is not most often seen, as it tends to stay out of sight in the leafy treetops.

 

The Olive-Sided Flycatcher was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The Olive-Sided Flycatcher was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin.

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The Olive-Sided Flycatcher is a large gray flycatcher with a large head and bill, and with a white throat and breast with contrasting light gray flanks separated by a white strip. It has a range of Alaska, Canada, and western and northeaster United States. It has a habitat of conifer forests, and burned out, and cleared areas. It feeds almost entirely on flying insects, and likes to view them from treetops.

The male Common Grackle was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin

The male Common Grackle was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin

The female Common Grackle was photographed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The female Common Grackle was photographed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The juvenile Common Grackle was photographed at Myrtle Beach, in South Carolina

The juvenile Common Grackle was photographed at Myrtle Beach, in South Carolina

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The Common Grackle is an iridescent blackbird larger than a Robin with a long wedge-shaped tail and a long heavy bill. The male has an iridescent purple head and a deep bronze or dull purple on the back. The female Common Grackle has a duller purple head and a browner, less iridescent on the back. The juvenile Common Grackle is a dull brown with various spotting depending on whether it is male or female. Depending on how the light hits the bird it may look almost black. It has a range of Canada and the United States east of the Rockies. It has a habitat of farmland, towns, groves, and streamsides. It feeds on insects of all types, worms, crayfish, other birds, and vegetable matter, such as berries and seeds. They are often seen nesting in small colonies and perching together in treetops.

The Veery was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin during bird migration.

The Veery was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin during bird migration.

Select his link to see photos of the Veery, next select slideshow

The Veery is a uniform brown or tawny cast above with no strong eye ring and few or indistinct spots on the breast. It has grayish tones on the flanks. It has a range of southern Canada, and north and central United States. It has a habitat of damp and deciduous woods. It concentrates in woods with leafy understory and streams. It feeds on mostly insects and berries.

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