This American Tree Sparrow was photographed at the Lake Express High Speed Ferry in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

This American Tree Sparrow was photographed at the Lake Express High Speed Ferry in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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The American Tree Sparrow is brown above with two white wing bars, and yellow below with a dark spot on the breast. It has a red brown cap, and a bill with the top darker and yellow below. Despite its name, it is not particularly associated with trees. It has a range of Alaska and Northern Canada, and resides the farthest North of any of its relatives. It has a habitat of arctic scrub, willow thickets, brushy roadsides, weedy edges, marshes, and feeders. It feeds mostly on seeds and insects. It often comes to feeders with Dark-Eyed Juncos.

The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center  on 4/28/2015.

The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

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The male Pine Warbler has olive-gray uppers with a yellow slightly streaked breast, dark legs, and white under parts, with white striped dark wings. The female Pine Warbler is similar colored to the male but duller. The immature Pine Warbler is drab all over with white wing bars. It has a range of eastern North America. It has a habitat of open pinewoods and pine barrens. It feeds on mostly insects, seeds, berries, and will come for suet at bird feeders.

 

The White-Faced Ibis was photographed at the Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin.

The White-Faced Ibis was photographed at the Horicon Marsh in Wisconsin.

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The White-Faced Ibis is a long legged deep purplish color with a long decurved bill, and a white border at the base of the bill. It has a range of the western United States to Argentina. It has a habitat of marshes, irrigated land, and swamps. It has a diet of small crustaceans, small fish, earthworms, and insects.

the Great Crested Flycatcher was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Whitnall park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The Great Crested Flycatcher was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Whitnall Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos of the Great Crested Flycatcher, next select slide-show

The Great Crested Flycatcher is a large sized flycatcher with cinnamon wings and tail, a gray breast, and a yellow belly and with a black beak, eyes, and legs. It is more easily heard than seen, but is impressive when seen. It has a range of South Canada, and eastern and central United States. It feeds on a wide variety of insects.

The adult Dare Snow Goose was photographed at Veterans Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan.

The adult Dark Snow Goose was photographed at Veterans Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan.

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Select this link to see photos of the White Snow Goose, next select slideshow

The Snow (Dark or Blue) Goose is dark gray-brown with a white head, and is the same species as the Snow (white) Goose. It has a range of Artic America and Northeast Siberia. It has a habitat of tundra (summer), marshes, grain fields, ponds, and bays. It is typically seen in large numbers or not at all. This sighting was a single Dark Snow Goose. The diet is almost entirely of plant material and seeds.

 

The adult Snow (White ) Goose was photographed at a pond in an Industrial Park in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The adult Snow (White ) Goose was photographed at a pond in an Industrial Park in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The juvenile Snow Goose and the adults were mostly photographed together.

The juvenile Snow Goose and the adults were mostly photographed together.

Select this link to see photos of the Snow (White) Goose, next select slideshow 

The Snow (White) Goose is a white goose with black primaries, and with pink feet and wedged shaped bill. It is often rust-stained on the head around the bill. The juvenile is pale gray with a dark bill. It has a range of Artic America and Northeast Siberia. It has a habitat of tundra (summer), marshes, grain fields, ponds, and bays. It is typically seen in large numbers or not at all. The diet is almost entirely of plant material and seeds.

 

The male Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The male Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The female Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Bong State Recreational Area in Franksville, Wisconsin.

The female Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Bong State Recreational Area in Kansasville, Wisconsin.

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Select this link to see comparison Downy Woodpecker photos

The Hairy Woodpecker are checkered and spotted with black and white and a white back, breast and undersides. The male has a small red patch on the back of the head. The Hairy is like a large Downy and it has a bill larger in comparison to the Downy’s. The Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers are the only Woodpeckers with a white back. It has a range from Alaska and Canada to Panama. It has a habitat of forests, woodlands, river groves, and large shade trees. It feeds mostly on seeds and insects. It is less common and likely to show up in suburbs and city parks.

 

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