Alaska


This male Harlequin Duck was photographed at the cruise ship dock in Juneau, Alaska.

The female Harlequin Duck was photographed at Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, Illinois on 2/16 2012.

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The male Harlequin Duck is a small slaty duck with chestnut sides and odd white patches and spots. The female Harlequin Duck is a dusky brown with three white spots on the side of its head, and no wing patches. It has a habitat of mountain streams in summer and rocky coastal waters in winter, and favors extremely turbulent streams. Its diet consists of mollusks, crustaceans, plant material, and insects.

 

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The Gray Jay was photographed at Denali Princess Lodge In Alaska.

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The Gray Jay is a gray fluffy bird about the size of a Robin with a white forehead, black cap, and gray back and wings, a light striped gray breast, and gray legs. The juvenile is darker sooty gray all over with a whitish chin whisker. They have a range of boreal forests of North American, Canada and Alaska. They have a habitat of spruce and fir forests. It has a varied diet of insects, spiders, berries, seeds, fungi, small rodents, small bird eggs, and carrion. They can be fearless, a nuisance, and steal food at campsites.

 

The Mew Gull was photographed on Nenano River and spruce tree tops at Denali Princess Wilderness Lodge in Alaska, and the bridge crossing on Salvage River East.

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The Mew Gull is smaller than a Ring-Billed Gull with white head, breast and bottom, a gray back, small greenish yellow bill and greenish legs. Its wing tips are black with white spots. It has a range of Northern Eurasia, western North America-that includes the bottom half of Alaska and northwestern Canada. It has a habitat of coastal waters in winter, and lakes and rivers in summer. The diet is mostly small fish along the coasts, mostly insects along inland lakes and rivers, but also eats crustaceans, mollusks, earthworms, small rodents, young birds, berries, and grains. Nest may be on high ground, on top of a stump, or in a dense low spruce up to 20ft above the ground-all near water.

 

The Atlantic Black Guillemot was photographed at the cruise ship dock in Juneau, Alaska.

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The Black Guillemot, during the summer, is a small black ducklike bird with a large white shoulder patch, bright red feet, black pointed bill, and orange-red inside of mouth. In winter it is pale with white underparts and a barred back, with black wings having the white patch.. It has a range of the North Atlantic sector of Arctic south to New England, USA. It has a habitat of inshore waters of the ocean rocky shores and islands. They mainly eat fish and crustaceans, some mollusks, insects, and plant material.

This lone Glaucous Gull was photographed north of Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan.

This lone Glaucous Gull was photographed north of Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Glaucous Gull

The Glaucous Gull is a chalky white gull with a gray mantle, frosty white wing tips, flesh colored legs, and large yellow bill. Adults have a pale gray mantle. It has a range of the Arctic; circumpolar, and comes to the Great Lakes and the northeast US coast. Also Alaska, western Canada coast, and northwestern US coast. It is the only large Gull common to the High Artic. It has a coastal habitat and seldom comes inland. The diet is highly variable, includes fish, mollusks, crustaceans, worms, sea urchins, insects, birds, eggs, berries, seaweed, and carrion (dead animals).

The Bonaparte’s Gull is the smallest Gull usually seen in North America.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Bonaparte’s Gull

The Bonaparte’s Gull is a small gray and white Gull with red legs, and a black head in the summer. The winter adult has a white head with a black earspot. This is the smallest gull usually seen over North America. It nests in trees and not on the ground, as other gulls do. Its normal range is from Alaska to central Canada. It winters on the Great Lakes and the coasts of the United States. Its habitat is Ocean Bays, rivers, and lakes. The diet is insects, crustaceans, and fish.

This Red-Tailed Hawk was seen and photographed at the Wehr Nature Center, Franklin, Wisconsin

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The adult Red-Tailed Hawk is a large brownish broad-winged wide-tailed hawk with a Rufus tail. An inhabitant of open country it is commonly seen perched on polls or  trees, or sailing over fields and woods. Although adults can be recognized by the reddish brown tail, the rest of the plumage can be quite variable. Red-Tails can range from blackish to rufous- brown to nearly white. Their diet is mammals, many birds, and reptiles. They have a habitat of open country, woodlands, prairie, groves, mountains, plains, and roadside. Their range covers Alaska, Canada, and the United States.

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