October 2010


The Brown Thrasher was photographed at Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, North Carolina

The Brown Thrasher was photographed at Fearrington Village in Pittsboro, North Carolina

For me, the Brown Thrasher has been a difficult bird to photograph, because of its habitat and skittishness.

For me, the Brown Thrasher has been a difficult bird to photograph, because of its habitat and skittishness.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Brown Thrasher

The Brown Thrasher is a very skittish bird that quickly heads for undergrowth when it is approached. It can be heard and seen running from growth to growth, but is hard to catch for a photo. It is fairly easy to identify with its color, breast stripes, and cat song voice with an occasional crack sound.

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Nearly identical with the Black-capped Chickadee but smaller and with less white in the wing area

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Carolina Chickadee

The Carolina Chickadee was photographed in Fearrington Village Camden Park, Pittsboro, NC. While photographing it I thought it was the Black-capped Chickadee. It wasn’t until later I learned it was the Carolina Chickadee.

The Black-Capped Chickadee is plentiful in Wisconsin most of the year.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Black-Capped Chickadee

The Black-Capped Chickadee has a range in Alaska, Canada, and the Northern half of the U.S. He is a small bird that is distinctively patterned with a combination black cap and bib, and white cheeks. The habitat is mixed and deciduous woods, willow thickets, groves, shade trees, and likes to visit feeders. He likes to eat suet and sunflower seeds. I like to watch him fly through the woods at approximately eyelevel, where he seems to fly in slow motion.

The Wild Turkey is seen more often and frequently comes to neighborhoods

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Wild Turkey

Select this link to see large photos of a rafter of wild turkeys

I have been trying to get a photo of a Wild Turkey for some time, but have found them to be elusive, or the lighting wasn’t good. I’ve even had them in my back yard. I had frequently seen them at the spot where I finally got the photo. However, as soon as they noticed me they started to take off for the woods. I had to take off in a run while preparing the camera to get close enough to get a picture. As the photos show, the Turkeys just stroll away. Seeing them from the road and getting the pictures and back in the car was no more than 5 minutes. It’s good that they are a large bird.