Carolina


The Brown Pelican was photographed at Murrells Inlet saltwater marsh walk waterfront in South Carolina

The Brown Pelican was photographed at Murrells Inlet saltwater marsh walk waterfront in South Carolina

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Brown Pelican

Select this link to see panorama photos of Murrells Inlet saltwater marsh walk

The Brown Pelican is a large gray-brown bird with white and brown about the head and neck, a gray pouch and legs. It has a range along the coasts of the United States. It has a habitat on salt bays, beaches, marshes, and ocean coasts and perches on posts and boats. Their diet is mostly fish and crustaceans. They fly close to the water and plunge bill first to get their food.

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This Barnacle Goose was photographed at the Sarah P. Duke University Gardens in Durham, North Carolina.

This Barnacle Goose was photographed at the Sarah P. Duke University Gardens in Durham, North Carolina.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Barnacle Goose

The Barnacle Goose is a small black and white goose with a black neck to the waterline, and a white face. It is heavily scalloped above. It is from the Arctic Coasts of Greenland and Siberia (it may occasionally reach northeastern North America), but it is considered an aviary bird. Its habitat is mainly salt bays, lakes, estuaries, and tundra. It eats stems and roots of grasses, seeds, berries, and aquatic plants.

These Muscovy Ducks were photographed in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

These Muscovy Ducks were photographed in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Muscovy Duck

The Muscovy Duck is a large domesticated duck that is predominantly black and white with pink or red wattles around the bill. They have claws on their feet and a flat tail. It is native to Mexico, Central and South America. The true wild Muscovy Duck is blackish with white wing patches. They have a habitat of urban and suburban lakes, and on farms, nesting in trees or on the ground under shrubs.  In the US it is an invasive species, an owner may raise them for food production only. They feed on roots, stems, leaves, and seeds of aquatic plants. They also eat small fish, crustaceans, and insects.

This younger Lesser Black-Backed Gull was photographed on Myrtle Beach in South Carolina

This younger Lesser Black-Backed Gull was photographed on Myrtle Beach in South Carolina

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Lesser Black-Backed Gull

The Lesser Black-Backed Gull has black back and snow-white underparts with pink (younger) and yellow (older) legs. The range is Northern Europe, but may be found migrating in North America. It has a habitat at beaches, bays, coasts, and garbage dumps. The diet includes fish, insects, mollusks, crustaceans, marine worms, and refuge in dumps. It has not been proven to nest in the United States. North American records are of the Britain/Iceland population that is indicated by a lighter black back. When seen they are few in number, and usually only for a short time.

This Turkey Vulture was photgraphed on a power line right-of-way in Pittsboro, NorthCarolina.

This Turkey Vulture was photgraphed on a power line right-of-way in Pittsboro, NorthCarolina.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Turkey Vulture

The Turkey Vulture is an eagle sized (spread 6 ft) black bird with a red turkey like head. Immature birds have black heads. When overhead note the 2-toned blackish wings as it soars, rocks and tilts unsteadily. It is a familiar sight over much of North America. It is a bird-of- prey and plays an important role in natures clean up, quickly disposing of carcasses of dead animals. It has a range over the United States and Southern Canada. It migrates in flocks and may travel long distances without feeding. It has a widespread habitat over open country, woods, deserts, and foothills. It varies from the Black Vulture by having a red head and a longer tail. It feeds mostly on carrion (dead animals and fish).

Wrens are common in open woods, and backyards of the southeast United States.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Carolina Wren

The Carolina Wren is about the size of a sparrow and is identified by a white eyebrow stripe and buffy underparts. It has a distinctive sound from the other Wrens. It has a range of the southeaster United States. It has a habitat of tangles, brushy undergrowth, mixed woods, suburban gardens, and towns.

Nearly identical with the Black-capped Chickadee but smaller and with less white in the wing area

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Carolina Chickadee

The Carolina Chickadee was photographed in Fearrington Village Camden Park, Pittsboro, NC. While photographing it I thought it was the Black-capped Chickadee. It wasn’t until later I learned it was the Carolina Chickadee.

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