The Ross's Goose was photographed at the South Shore Yacht Club in Bayview, Wisconsin.

The Ross’s Goose was photographed at the South Shore Yacht Club in Bayview, Wisconsin.

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The Ross’s Goose is small in size, primarily white with black wing tips, red-orange feet, and stubby red-orange beak. There is a dark morph, but it is rare. It has a range of Artic Canada and winters in western United States. It is found in the tundra (summer), salt and freshwater marshes, ponds, and grain fields in their winter. It eats mostly grasses and grains. This was a loner goose that stayed for some time with several Canadian Geese, and seemed to travel with them. I never saw it fly, but saw it at several times at different locations.

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The adult Dare Snow Goose was photographed at Veterans Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan.

The adult Dark Snow Goose was photographed at Veterans Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan.

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The Snow (Dark or Blue) Goose is dark gray-brown with a white head, and is the same species as the Snow (white) Goose. It has a range of Artic America and Northeast Siberia. It has a habitat of tundra (summer), marshes, grain fields, ponds, and bays. It is typically seen in large numbers or not at all. This sighting was a single Dark Snow Goose. The diet is almost entirely of plant material and seeds.

 

The adult Snow (White ) Goose was photographed at a pond in an Industrial Park in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The adult Snow (White ) Goose was photographed at a pond in an Industrial Park in Franklin, Wisconsin.

The juvenile Snow Goose and the adults were mostly photographed together.

The juvenile Snow Goose and the adults were mostly photographed together.

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The Snow (White) Goose is a white goose with black primaries, and with pink feet and wedged shaped bill. It is often rust-stained on the head around the bill. The juvenile is pale gray with a dark bill. It has a range of Artic America and Northeast Siberia. It has a habitat of tundra (summer), marshes, grain fields, ponds, and bays. It is typically seen in large numbers or not at all. The diet is almost entirely of plant material and seeds.

 

The Chinese Goose was photographed near Rolling Oak Road and S. Harrah Road in Norman, Oklahoma.

The Chinese Goose was photographed near Rolling Oak Road and S. Harrah Road in Norman, Oklahoma.

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The Chinese Goose is brown and white with a black bill that often has a basal knob at the upper part of the bill and forehead, and orange legs. They are descended from the wild swan goose native to Asia. Chinese Geese are often found with other geese, ducks, Muscovy, and chickens in a pen on a farm. They are among the better laying breeds of geese as well as produce twice as many goslings. The Geese eat many grasses and herbaceous plants and are referred to as “Weeder Geese.” It is an economical breed, as the stock is generally less expensive than other breeds.

This Barnacle Goose was photographed at the Sarah P. Duke University Gardens in Durham, North Carolina.

This Barnacle Goose was photographed at the Sarah P. Duke University Gardens in Durham, North Carolina.

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The Barnacle Goose is a small black and white goose with a black neck to the waterline, and a white face. It is heavily scalloped above. It is from the Arctic Coasts of Greenland and Siberia (it may occasionally reach northeastern North America), but it is considered an aviary bird. Its habitat is mainly salt bays, lakes, estuaries, and tundra. It eats stems and roots of grasses, seeds, berries, and aquatic plants.

This Bar-Headed Goose was photographed in the San Antonio, Texas Zoo

This Bar-Headed Goose was photographed in the San Antonio, Texas Zoo

The Bar-Headed Goose is a tan and white goose with black bars on the head and neck, and orange legs and bill. It is an exotic native to Central Asia that is occasionally seen in North America and Zoos. The habitat is lakes, ponds, bays, marshes, and fields. It feeds mostly on plant material and seeds.

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This Cackling Goose and Canada Goose were photographed at Veterans Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan

This Cackling Goose and Canada Goose were photographed at Veterans Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on Lake Michigan

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The Canada Goose was split into two species in 2004; the Canada goose and the Cackling Goose. These also have subspecies. Basically they look the same except the Cackling is smaller in size and has a shorter bill. They can usually be found or noticed by staying and traveling in their own flock, but as I found this is difficult. The Cackling breeds farther north and westward than does the Canada. The Cackling is seen more in the western United States.