Juvenile


This darker Field Sparrow was photographed at Lake Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

This darker Field Sparrow was photographed at Lake Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

This lighter Fed Sparrow was photographed in Marshfield, Missouri.

This lighter Field Sparrow was photographed in Marshfield, Missouri.

This is a gray Field Sparrow photographed in Bender Park in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.

This is a gray Field Sparrow photographed in Bender Park in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.

This juvenile Field Sparrow was photographed at Whitnall park in Milwaukee County.

This juvenile Field Sparrow was photographed at Whitnall park in Milwaukee County.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Field Sparrow

The Field Sparrow has a rusty cap with rufous striped upper parts, clear breast, a white-eye ring, a long slender tail, and less notable facial striping with a stout pink bill. Depending on the time of the year it may have darker or lighter coloring. A juvenile Field sparrow has a finely streaked breast. There is also a gray adult Field Sparrow that is worn and faded. They range from southeastern Canada and the eastern half of the United States. They have a habitat of brushy pastures, brush, and scrub. They have a diet of seeds and insects. It forages on the ground or in low vegetation.

This Eurasian Collared-Dove was photographed in Johnstown, Colorado.

This Eurasian Collared-Dove was photographed in Johnstown, Colorado.

This is a juvenile Erasian Collared-Dove that hasn't developed the narrow black half-collar on the hindneck.

This is a juvenile Eurasian Collared-Dove that hasn’t developed the narrow black half-collar on the hindneck.

The Eurasian Collared-Dove was accidentally introduced in 1974 to the Bahamas and shortly after Florida. It is currently increasing and spreading through the United States form the southeast.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Eurasian Collard-Dove

The Eurasian Collared-Dove is a pale dusty brown, relieved by paler, grayer face, a narrow black half-collar on the hindneck, and a white terminal half to the black tail. It has an expanding range from Florida and the southeast of the United States. It has a habitat in suburbs, residential areas, farmland, wood edges, and open country. It feeds mostly on mostly seeds, some berries, and insects. It usually forages in flocks by walking on the ground and fluttery in branches of trees, or shrubs to take berries.

The below link will show a similar Ringed Turtle Dove, but smaller  for comparison.

Select this link to see a similar Dove, Ringed Turtle Dove, for comparison

This Great Horned Owl was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

This Great Horned Owl was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

This Great Horned Owl was photographed with a VHS video in Muskego, Wisconsin in 1988.

This Great Horned Owl was photographed with a VHS video in Muskego, Wisconsin in 1988.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Great Horned Owl

The Great Horned Owl is either red-brown or gray in color with large tufts. It varies regionally from very dark to very pale and has a white throat bib. It habitats in North America in forests, mixed woodlands, streamsides, open country, shady suburbs, and city parks. It roosts during the day in high perches, and is active at night. It has no regular migration but may wander long distances in fall and winter. It’s diet is varied, mostly mammals and birds. May begin nesting very early in the North-late winter.

The Black-Throated Green Warbler was sited and photographed at the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, WI.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Black-Throated Green Warbler

The female is recognized by the yellow face, olive crown and with slight black on throat. The range is mostly the Northeast states and Canada. Their habitat is mainly conifers. I was only able to briefly view the Black-Throated Green Female Warbler as they passed through the area in only a short time. Other bird watchers pointed it out and had previously seen it.

You can see the sited location at the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, WI by clicking the link below.

Select this link to see the Black-Throated Green Warbler site where it was sighted and photographed.

The White Crowned “Ghostly” Sparrow can be seen in Canada and the States, but rarely in Florida or the SE coast. Photo shot in the fall in Marshfield, Missouri.

This White-Crowned Sparrow was photographed during spring migration at the Wehr Nature Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Photo was shot in the fall on the shoreline north of Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Note the gray crown coloring on this White-Crowned Sparrow.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the White Crowned Sparrow

Identification of this sparrow is a clear grayish breast, a striped black and white crown, and a pink bill. They are stunning to see, as the sparrow is so bright looking compared to other sparrows. It hops about and seems to always hide itself behind brush, or limbs and leaves. When I photographed the sparrow photo above I thought something was wrong, as the colors appeared faded out or ghostly. It took some time to figure out it was the bright white color glaring in the sunlight.

The White-Crowned Sparrow can be seen across Canada and the States, but is rarely seen in Florida or the east coast. It likes a habitat of brush, edges, tangles, and roadsides. I have seen them in brush and dense tangles, where they are constantly appearing to hide. In this case there were thorns making it difficult to reach them for viewing and photographing.