Nature Center


The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The male Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 4/28/2015.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The female Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/11/2016.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

The immature Pine Warbler was photographed at Wehr Nature Center on 5/17/2011.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Pine Warbler

The male Pine Warbler has olive-gray uppers with a yellow slightly streaked breast, dark legs, and white under parts, with white striped dark wings. The female Pine Warbler is similar colored to the male but duller. The immature Pine Warbler is drab all over with white wing bars. It has a range of eastern North America. It has a habitat of open pinewoods and pine barrens. It feeds on mostly insects, seeds, berries, and will come for suet at bird feeders.

 

Advertisements
The male Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The male Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The female Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Bong State Recreational Area in Franksville, Wisconsin.

The female Hairy Woodpecker was photographed at the Bong State Recreational Area in Kansasville, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Hairy Woodpecker

Select this link to see comparison Downy Woodpecker photos

The Hairy Woodpecker are checkered and spotted with black and white and a white back, breast and undersides. The male has a small red patch on the back of the head. The Hairy is like a large Downy and it has a bill larger in comparison to the Downy’s. The Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers are the only Woodpeckers with a white back. It has a range from Alaska and Canada to Panama. It has a habitat of forests, woodlands, river groves, and large shade trees. It feeds mostly on seeds and insects. It is less common and likely to show up in suburbs and city parks.

 

The Peregrine Falcon was photographed at the Wisconsin State Fair from the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The Peregrine Falcon was photographed at the Wisconsin State Fair from the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Peregrine Falcon

The Peregrine Falcon is crow size with slaty-back, light chest barred and spotted below. It has noted heavy black sideburns, pointed wings and a narrow barred tail. It has a range nearly worldwide. It has a habitat of open country, cliffs, and sometimes cities. It feeds on mostly birds, and is a reason birds scatter when it is around. It is one of the world’s fastest birds and is noted with power-diving from great heights to strike prey. It is regarded by falconers as one of the noblest and spectacular of all birds of prey. It is an endangered species.

 

The rehabbed Northern Saw-Whet Owl was photographed at the Wisconsin State Fair from the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in Milwaukee.

The rehabbed Northern Saw-Whet Owl was photographed at the Wisconsin State Fair from the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in Milwaukee.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Saw-Whet Owl

The Northern Saw-Whet Owl is a very small tame-like Owl brown in color with white braces on the back and brown streaking below, and with a pale buffy facial disc. It is fairly common but hard to spot in nature. It has a range from southeast Alaska, Canada, western and northeast United States to central Mexico. It has a habitat of forests, conifers and groves. They roost in dense cavities or in dense vegetation. Their diet is mostly small rodents, and swoop down on their prey at night from a high perch. These birds have exceptional hearing and vision at low light and night.

Select this link to see info on the Saw-Whet Owl

Select this link to see other info on Saw-Whet Owls

 

The male Common Grackle was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin

The male Common Grackle was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin

The female Common Grackle was photographed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The female Common Grackle was photographed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

The juvenile Common Grackle was photographed at Myrtle Beach, in South Carolina

The juvenile Common Grackle was photographed at Myrtle Beach, in South Carolina

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Common Grackle

The Common Grackle is an iridescent blackbird larger than a Robin with a long wedge-shaped tail and a long heavy bill. The male has an iridescent purple head and a deep bronze or dull purple on the back. The female Common Grackle has a duller purple head and a browner, less iridescent on the back. The juvenile Common Grackle is a dull brown with various spotting depending on whether it is male or female. Depending on how the light hits the bird it may look almost black. It has a range of Canada and the United States east of the Rockies. It has a habitat of farmland, towns, groves, and streamsides. It feeds on insects of all types, worms, crayfish, other birds, and vegetable matter, such as berries and seeds. They are often seen nesting in small colonies and perching together in treetops.

The Veery was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin during bird migration.

The Veery was photographed at Wehr Nature Center in Franklin, Wisconsin during bird migration.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Veery

The Veery is a uniform brown or tawny cast above with no strong eye ring and few or indistinct spots on the breast. It has grayish tones on the flanks. It has a range of southern Canada, and north and central United States. It has a habitat of damp and deciduous woods. It concentrates in woods with leafy understory and streams. It feeds on mostly insects and berries.

This Swamp Sparrow was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

This Swamp Sparrow was photographed at the Wehr Nature Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Swamp Sparrow

The Swamp Sparrow is a dark rusty sparrow with a dull gray breast, an outlined white throat, and a rusty-reddish cap. It has a range east of the Rockies from Canada to the Gulf Coast. It has a habitat in marshes with tussocks, bushes, or cattails, and sedgy swamps. The diet is mostly insects and seeds. It is usually a solitary sulker in dense cover.

Next Page »