Photos


The Grasshopper Sparrow was photographed at Lake Park north of Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see a photo album of the Grasshopper Sparrow, next select slideshow

A little sparrow of open fields with a short sharp tail, flat head, yellow shoulder, and with a crown that is median striped with chestnut and black. It differs from other sparrows of the prairie in having a relatively unstriped buffy breast. The bird’s song is similar to the sound of a grasshopper. It can be found from Southern Canada to the Southern United States in prairie type habitats. Its habitat is grasslands, hayfields, and prairies. Its diet is mostly insects and seeds. It almost always forages for food alone.

 

Two Piping Plovers were photographed at Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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The Piping Plover is a small pale bird, the color of dry sand, with an incomplete dark ring around the neck, and throat, belly and undersides white, with yellow legs, yellow beak with a black tip. In winter the legs and bill are dark. It has a range of south Canada to northeast and central United States. It has a habitat of sand beaches and tidal flats. It has a diet of insects, marine worms, and crustaceans. It moves about in quick fashion and abrupt stops, and is hard to see when on the sand when foraging by pecking.

 

The breeding male Wood Duck was photographed in September at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The female Wood Duck was photographed at Greenfield Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The non-breeding male Wood Duck was photographed in September at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The juvenile Wood Ducks were photographed at Whitnall Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The fussy chick Wood Ducks were photographed with the female wood duck at Greenfield Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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The male breeding Wood Duck has a highly colored face pattern with sweptback chest, white belly, dark back with dark squared of tail, and all with unique rainbow iridescence. The female Wood Duck is dull colored with a gray crested head with a white-eye patch. The non-breeding male Wood Duck is a brown color with dark head that has a white bridle on the throat. They have a range of south Canada to northeast, and central United States eastward and northwest. They have a habitat of wooded swamps, rivers, and ponds, mainly those surrounded by shading woodlands overhanging the water. They have a diet of mostly seeds of aquatic plants. It has no close relative except for the Mandarin Duck of eastern Asia.

 

The Clay-Colored Sparrow was photographed at Bender Park in Oak Creek, Wisconsin

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The Clay-Colored Sparrow is a small pale brown sparrow with a plain breast, a light crown stripe, an outlined ear patch, brownish rump, and a clean gray nape. It has a range from west and central Canada to north central United States. It has a habitat of scrub, brushy prairies, and Jack Pines. It is found perched in thickets. It has a diet of mostly seeds and insects. It is very close in looks to a Chipping Sparrow and is hard to distinguish.

 

The Bank Swallow is elusive and fluttery as it stops for moments to gather food

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The Bank Swallow is a brown backed swallow with white below and a shaded brown waistband. The Bank Swallow is the smallest of the swallows. It has a widespread range of the Northern Hemisphere. Its habitat is near water, over fields, marshes, streams, and lakes. It nests in colonies in sand banks. The nest is one of the few places that the Bank Sparrow rests for a short time, and it is usually difficult to photograph them. They were photographed at McKinley Beach in Milwaukee, and Bender Park in Oak Creek  Wisconsin.

 

The Common Snipe was photographed at Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area in Montana.

The Common Snipe was photographed at Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area in Montana.

This Common Snipe was photograph by surprise while trying to find the American Bittern on Pennsylvania Ave. between Oakwood and Ryan Roads in Oak Creek, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see photos or a slideshow of the Common Snipe

The Common Snipe is brown with buff and bold zigzag stripes on the back, a striped head, an extremely long bill, greenish legs, and a short orange tail. The range is most of North America. It has a habitat of marshes, bogs and wet meadows. It is a solitary creature of wet fields and bogs. It can often be heard sitting from atop a fence post or dead tree. It has a diet of mostly insects and earthworms found from probing in soft mud.

 

The American Bittern was photographed on Pennsylvania Ave. between Oakwood and Ryan Roads in Oakcreek, Wisconsin.

Select this link to see an album of photos of the American Bittern, next select slideshow

The American Bittern is a stocky brown heron with a black stripe on the neck, a head usually pointed up, and green legs. It has a range of Canada to the Gulf States, and winters in Panama. It has a habitat of marshes, reedy lakes or water, and seldom sits in trees. Its head is usually pointed upward with the black neck streak seen. It has a diet of mostly fish and other aquatic life. They move slowly through marsh grass, and are difficult to see with so little movement.

 

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